Posts Tagged ‘herbs’

How to Naturally Repel Mosquitoes

June 4, 2009

Do biting mosquitoes and other flying pests spoil the fun of summer ? Mosquitoes can carry diseases that they spread by transmitting germs through their stingers. Are you worried about the ecology of your body and yard in your effort to combat these stinging summer spoilers? Light wearing and cooling to the skin blends of certain essential oils from plants repel biting flying insects. Diminish their nasty influence by making or buying natural insect repellent.

These recipes for natural repellents will repel mosquitoes and other biting flying insect s and are safe to use on plants, adults, babies and children, and will not harm pets. They are devoid of DEET (diethyl-meta-toluamide) which is the most common active ingredient in insect repellents but is toxic. These essential oil blends will rid you of sand gnats, horseflies, deer flies, and mosquitoes without a drop of poison.

Some essential oils favored for their effectiveness as insect repellents are:

• Eucalyptus, recommended as effective by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

• Catnip oil, containing nepetalactone, which researchers at Iowa State University have found to be ten times stronger than DEET

• Citronella, long used as an insect repellent, and Lavender, Basil, Lemongrass, Thyme and Patchouli can provide other repellent qualities and delightful fragrances to make interesting blends.

Make a natural insect repellent by using a spray bottle that combines water and essential oils combined together, such as Lemongrass, Lavender, Tea Tree and Citronella. Another good blend combines Peppermint, Eucalyptus and Citronella. Both combinations work and smell good on the wearer.

For example, use the Peppermint, Eucalyptus, Citronella combination. Peppermint, eucalyptus and citronella all have especially potent properties that repel many flying, biting pests.

All you will need is a bottle and either a distilled water or a carrier oil. Pour the oil or water into a 1ounce bottle. Adding 20-100 drops of each essential oil allows you to get the scent just right for you.

Shake each time you use the mixture to ensure the oils are mixed and distributed evenly before applying.

You might find that you need to reapply frequently for maximum effectiveness so reapply as necessary. Under normal outdoor conditions, the repellent will last an hour or more. You can safely mist as often as you like to suit variations in your biochemistry or a particular environment. Spray it all over, even your face. Be careful not to spray it into your eyes. Peppermint is very irritating to soft mucous tissues like eyes.

Here is a link to a video showing the easy steps to making your own natural insect repellant: http://www.ehow.com/video_4994300_make-natural-insect-repellent.html

Be sure to keep your mist close on hand and in keep some in your picnic or bicycle basket. To maximize effectiveness be sure your bath soap fragrance will not attract bugs and do not wear perfumes and colognes if you plan to be outside for any length of time mid spring through late autumn.

If making your own insect repellent is not going to make your ‘list of things to do’ there are several brands on the market that you can comparison shop before buying. Herbaria Citronella Mist has been featured in Vegetarian Times Magazine and claims that their lemon eucalyptus mist has been found by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention to be as effective against mosquitoes as popular brands containing small amounts of DEET.

Used as intended these hard working essential oil products effectively give relief from biting pests and do not cause harm to humans, pets or the environment.

Cathleen V. Carr, Natural Medicine Ink © 2009 All Rights Reserved.

Cathleen V. Carr is the National holistic Health Examiner for Examiner.com and writes articles, product reviews, etc. about green living and natural health for various media outlets.

FDA Warns Consumers Not to Purchase Herbal Version of “Ecstasy”

August 16, 2008

FDA Warns Consumers Not to Purchase Herbal Version of “Ecstasy”

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has issued a warning that consumers should not consume a liquid dietary supplement called Green Hornet. This product has been marketed on the Internet and sold in stores as a herbal version of the illegal street drug “Ecstasy”. Four teenagers were rushed to hospital emergency rooms suffering from seizures, excessive heart rates, severe body rashes and high blood pressure after consuming the product. The product involved in the case of the teenagers were distributed by Kekio, Inc. of Colorado Springs, doing business as a store called Mind Excursions, however, the manufacturer remains unknown. Two active ingredients contained in the product are over-the-counter antitussive (dextromethorphan) and antihistamine (diphenhydramine) agents.

by Cathleen V. Carr

Visit the Best Natural Health Directory.com

Food,Nutrition and Cancer

June 17, 2008

When it comes to cancer, there are no guarantees. However, improving your diet may reduce your risk of cancer, help you to heal more efficiently and hasten your recovery from cancer treatments.

What you need to know

  • Focus on fiber: Eat foods rich in fiber, especially those made with whole grains, to help reduce the risk of several cancers
  • Find healthy fats: Meals containing olive oil or fish help protect against cancer, and avoiding fat from meat, dairy, and processed foods may decrease cancer risk
  • Go vegetarian: Lower cancer risk by eating plenty of fruits, whole grains, legumes, and vegetables (especially tomatoes and cruciferous vegetables like cabbage), which helps to optimize body weight, immune function, hormone regulation, and to avoid meat-related carcinogens
  • Avoid alcohol: Use alcoholic beverages in moderation or not at all to reduce the risk of many cancers
  • Get regular checkups: Many cancers can be prevented or discovered in the early stages with screening tests available through your healthcare provider

These recommendations are not comprehensive and are not intended to replace the advice of your doctor or pharmacist. Continue reading the full cancer prevention and diet article for more in-depth, fully-referenced information on medicines, vitamins, herbs, and dietary and lifestyle changes that may be helpful.